Why Chinese like number 6&8 and hate 4 ?

    In Chinese tradition, certain numbers are believed by some to be auspicious (吉利jili) or inauspicious (不吉利bujili) based on the Chinese word that the number name sounds similar to. The numbers 6 and 8 are believed to have auspicious meanings because their names sound similar to words that have positive meanings.
 
    The number 6 represents wealth in Cantonese, this number is a homophone for (祿 Lok). 6 (六, Pinyin: liù) in Mandarin is pronounced the same as "liu" (溜, Pinyin: liù) and similar to "flow" (流, Pinyin: liú) and is therefore considered good for business
 
    The word for "eight" (8 Pinyin: bā) sounds similar to the word which means "prosper" or "wealth" (發 – short for "發財",Pinyin: fā). In regional dialects the words for "eight" and "fortune" are also similar, e.g., Cantonese "baat3" and "faat3".
There is also a visual resemblance between two digits, "88", and 囍, the "shuāng xĭ" ("double joy"), a popular decorative design composed of two stylized characters 喜 ("xĭ" meaning "joy" or "happiness").
The number 8 is viewed as such an auspicious number that even being assigned a number with several eights is considered very lucky.
·         In 2003, A telephone number with all digits being eights was sold for CN¥2.33 million (approximately USD$280,000) to Sichuan Airlines in Chengdu, China.
·          The opening ceremony of the Summer Olympics in Beijing began on 8/8/08 at 8 seconds and 8 minutes past 8 pm local time
·         A man in Hangzhou offered to sell his license plate reading A88888 for ¥1.12 million (roughly $164,000). The Petronas Twin Towers in Malaysia each have 88 floors.
 
     As for Number 4 (四; accounting 肆; pinyin ) is considered an unlucky number in Chinese because it is nearly homophonous to the word "death" (死 pinyin sǐ). Due to that, many numbered product lines skip the "4":
e.g., Nokia cell phones (there is no series beginning with a 4), Palm[PDAs, Canon PowerShot G's series (after G3 goes G5), etc.
In East Asia, some buildings do not have a 4th floor. (Compare with the Western practice of some buildings not having a 13th floor because 13 is considered unlucky.)
In Hong Kong, some high-rise residential buildings omit all floor numbers with "4", e.g., 4, 14, 24, 34 and all 40–49 floors. As a result, a building whose highest floor is number 50 may actually have only 35 physical floors.